Photos of some of the beautiful and unusual guitars which I have owned, restored, or sold.

 

Guitars which are currently for sale will be listed on the FOR SALE page

 

c.1962 BURNS 'Defiant' Archtop

c.1962 BURNS 'Defiant' Archtop

c.1962 BURNS 'Defiant' Archtop

 

Golden Sunburst Finish, Non-Cutaway Thin-Bodied Archtop, with internal 'BURNS' Label

c.1962 BURNS 'Defiant' Archtop

Label reads "DEFIANT - BURNS LONDON - SERIAL NO: 00722"

c.1962 BURNS 'Defiant' Archtop

[click image above for double-size image of label]

 

This interesting guitar appears to be a MELODIJA Acoustic Cello-Guitar from Menges (Slovenija), imported to Britain and re-branded as a BURNS 'Defiant'

 

c.1962 BURNS 'Defiant' Archtop

 

Weird taper to depth of the Headstock, with open-backed Tuners of similar appearance to early 'Rugby Ball'-buttoned Van Gents

 

c.1962 BURNS 'Defiant' Archtop

Polished Brass 'DEFIANT' name-badge with grey-painted highlights on tailpiece

 

c.1962 BURNS 'Defiant' Archtop

Hand-Painted model name on headstock, over remnants of removed previous maker's badge?

c.1962 BURNS 'Defiant' Archtop

Featuring neck-mounted re-badged upside-down Rellog pickup and soundhole-mounted control panel.

 


Comments:

Regarding the Burns Archtop - I have seen a couple of these over the years. The music trade shows, especially Frankfurt etc.. were a real hunting ground for wheeler/dealers in the mid-late 50's. It wasn't unusual for dealers to go over and buy up small amounts of guitars etc... bring them home and re-brand them as their own. Everybody was doing it - much like it happens in China today. Jim Burns was no exception - and he obviously acquired a number of these units, probably quite cheaply - and then tarted them up with pickups, badges etc... (I think the Defiant logo was actually off a fridge or something similar). The pickups were normally Relogg's or Fuma's - with a different cover added. Like most Burns serial numbers - they were complete fantasy  - I doubt if there were ever more than 20 of these modified - probably a lot less. An interesting snapshot in time though - Burns was a sucker for buying things cheaply and re-using them (such as the TV cabinet amplifier boxes). I'd love to know how much he paid for them......... Cheers, Ade

Adrian Turner, Burns London Design Team / Adeson Pickups

 

This guitar was not made in my time (at Burns). I know there were some queer ones when I started; acoustics with no heels, (whose) scratchplates were very plain, but it all changed to production models. Nice to hear from you any time I can help give me a shout. Norm

Norman Houlder, Burns Factory Machine Manager c. 1962-65

 

I first met Jim Burns when he was introduced to me 1969 by Ivor Arbiter as a consultant for the Dallas-Arbiter company, and learned from having conversations with him (Ivor), Jim, and the people working around him that they had been experimenting with Acoustic Prototypes but never in any great volume and only at a prototype level, and never went into production with them. Jim, like many other companies in the sixties, was taking delivery of guitars in batches from Europe and re-labelling them.  Your particular model certainly has the look of a European vintage, probably Western Germany as you suggested. The need to mark any imports with the country of origin was not enforced in those days.  The name DEFIANT certainly rings a bell in my memory of being a Vox Amp but I could not find any reference to it in my old leaflets. I hope you find the information of interest. Best Regards, Bob

Bob Pearson, later Burns UK/Hayman associate

If anyone has any further information or opinions about this guitar, please email info@blackguitars.com!